In order to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement, technology that makes it possible to capture and store CO2 is required. Norwegian expertise from the offshore and maritime industries is helping to apply elements of the value chain from oil and gas production to depositing greenhouse gases back into the seabed. With the Stella Maris project, Altera Infrastructure will be able to inject up to ten million tonnes of CO2 into suitable reservoirs.

Together with numerous partners, they have carried out a feasibility study to realize large-scale transport and injection of CO2. In the study, the flow of oil is ‘reversed’ by transporting CO2 back to the oil fields. The feasibility study will receive NOK four million from Gassnova, with the partners matching that amount.

Large-scale transport and injection of CO2 under low pressure and temperature is both technically possible and economically quite favourable.

Frank Wettland, Project Manager, Altera Infrastructure. 

– The preliminary results are very good. Large-scale transport and injection of CO2 under low pressure and temperature is both technically possible and economically quite favourable. Now the concept will be matured and optimized, says Frank Wettland, Project Manager at Altera Infrastructure.

Further development and scaling of the technology will make it possible to transport large amounts of CO2 from various sources in Europe to a floating reception and injection facility in the North Sea. The floating injection platform will receive ships with a cargo capacity of 50,000 m³ cooled, pressurized CO₂. The platform will be able to inject up to ten million tonnes of CO₂ a year.

According to calculations made in connection with the Northern Lights project, 65-75 million tonnes of CO₂ will need to be deposited annually in Europe. Stella Maris will be an important contributor toward meeting this need.