The plan is to have the first mobile wind farms ready for production of electricity from 2024, as an alternative to electricity from land. The company has thus far received NOK 10 million from Enova to develop the concept.

“Access to enough renewable energy, both on land and at sea, is one of our biggest challenges if we are to achieve the climate goals. This also applies to the petroleum industry, which aims to cut climate emissions by 50 percent by 2030, says Per Lund,” CEO of Odfjell Oceanwind.

“Given this, it is a great advantage to be able to supply renewable energy to the shelf without actually affecting the power system on land, and there comes at a time when we want to create new, power-intensive industries across the country.”

Access to enough renewable energy, both on land and at sea, is one of our biggest challenges if we are to achieve the climate goals.

Per Lund, CEO of Odfjell Oceanwind.

Reduces up to 70 percent of CO2 emissions

Odfjell Oceanwind will supply typical ‘off-grid’ or ‘micro-grid’ customers. These are not connected to the public power grid, and often operate on fossil fuels such as natural gas or diesel. To achieve this, they have entered into collaboration with both Siemens Gamesa and Siemens Energy, who will produce wind turbines and batteries for the offshore wind platforms, respectively.

“Together with Siemens, we have developed a completely unique offshore wind platform solution that we call “WindGrid”. In addition to wind turbines that can withstand harsh weather use, we have batteries on the offshore wind platforms that provide electricity storage. At most, the «WindGrid» solution can ensure a reduction in CO2 emissions of 70 percent compared with conventional fossil solutions,” Lund says.

New technology makes it possible to move wind farms from place to place. The units can be reused for more than 50 years, about the same as with ships and rigs.

Per Lund, CEO of Odfjell Oceanwind.

Turbines that can be used for more than 50 years

The mobile offshore wind turbines are sold or rented out in packages of varying sizes, and are to be anchored in the immediate vicinity of the platforms to be supplied with electricity. Towards the end of the field’s lifetime, the offshore wind turbines are moved for reuse at the next location.

As the turbines are not connected to the power grid on land, the company is not obligated to participate in the time-consuming processes for awarding offshore wind licenses. The rental model for the MOWUs also provides flexibility for fields with short or uncertain remaining service life, where it is difficult for operators to defend heavy investments.

“Traditionally, we have thought of offshore wind as permanent wind farms, but new technology makes it possible to move wind farms from place to place. The units can be reused for more than 50 years, about the same as with ships and rigs,” Lund explains.

Over 50 years of offshore experience

A merger between Odfjell Drilling and Oceanwind AS, the company Odfjell Oceanwind has a total of 50 years of offshore experience and 20 years of experience with offshore wind. Lund believes this is a good starting point for acquiring a position on the offshore wind segment:

“We have extensive experience in both floating offshore wind and the rig segment, and for us it is all about using the expertise we have built up in the best possible way. Our goal is therefore to take a leading position in floating offshore wind, and ensure access to flexible offshore wind solutions.”

With the goal of energy production by 2024, the plan is to commission the first offshore wind turbines in 2022.

“We are already in close dialogue with several operating companies that want to connect our floating wind turbines to their oil and gas installations, and look forward to helping to significantly reduce emissions on the Norwegian continental shelf,” Lund concludes.